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the manual recommends 30k I did mine as well as many others at 60k
I took it to the dealer and it cost me $200 for 17quart flush
 

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I think that 60k is fine, 30k may be overkill. What we do on my mom's car is a drain and fill every 30k or so. This changes about half of the fluid and I think it makes a flush unneccesary.
 

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Wow 200 bucks? you got ripped.. most anywhere will do it for about 100. Anyway I am actually doin mine soon and its been about 20K but I drive my truck hard so I might as well baby her. :)
 

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I did it myself, granted I don't have a tranny pressurizer, I used the pressure of the system. I made sure to overfill some initially to make sure I wouldn't run low while flushing it. Fill while it drains out of the tranny fluid hose. In my case it was easy because I have a tranny cooler so I had hoses right in the front exposed and easy to remove.
 

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the automatic trannys work off of hydraulic pressure and the fluid is the life of the tranny. better to change the fluid often to insure your tranny is always in great shape. the fluid should be drained and refilled every 30k because if you end up waiting later, you will eventually need to flush it. every 30k will guarantee good fluid in the tranny because when you drain the fluid in the pan you still have fluid in the torque converter and the rest of the lines and tranny. if you wait till 60, you are gonna have to flush the tranny in order toget rid of the old fluid. everyone should consider changing the fluid by themselves, its as easy as changing the engine oil, remove the plug on the tranny pan, drain, install drain plug, and refill with the required fluid to the right capacity. Manual trannys every 60k because its really thick gear lube, it takes time to break the actual fluid down itself and its just a drain and refill process.
 

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I have always seen from my experience, flushing a tranny is a bad thing and that your just asking for trouble.You should change the filter and fluid on a regular basis though. My neighbor just went on a trip and had the tranny flushed right before he left and BLAM. He arrived only to find fluid leaking out of the seals. Stealership says he overheated his overdrive. Yet they are the ones that did the chitty job.:brickknoc
 

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I would recommend the flush, cheap insurance in my view. I did it myself at 30k, now do a drain and fill every 10K with Amsoil ATF...but I'm a little anal with maintenance. If you don't want to spend the money on a flush, do the drain and fill, depending on your transmission it gets about half the fluid. Then do the drain and fill every 15 or 20k. I can't speak for your year, but the previous models have a screen and not a paper filter, if you have the pan dropped, they clean the filter (screen) with brake cleaner and put it back.
 

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Just have heard many horror stories. Read and decide for yourself.:thinking:

A New "Recommended" Maintenance Item...

In the last few years you were probably asked, or told, by you dealer or quick lube place that you need an engine or transmission flush, because the engine oil or transmission fluid is very dirty. They will tell you that it is recommended that you have it done because your engine or transmission will last longer if it is flushed clean. In that they are correct, a clean engine and transmission will last longer. But is flushing the best way to get a dirty engine clean?
What Is An Engine Or Transmission Flush?

Flushing is the high pressure forcing of fluid back against the normal flow of the fluid. In other words if the normal flow is left to right, the flush would force the fluid right to left. This is accomplished by connecting a machine that will force special solvents back through the engine and transmission. The idea is that by forcing cleaning solvents backwards through the system, it will get all the junk and garbage that has formed over time and "flush" it out of the system. In theory this may be sound, but in actual practice, it's dangerous.
The Dangers Of Flushing...

Flush machines do what they say; they force high pressure cleaning solvents back through the engine and transmission and clean out some of the accumulated junk that has formed. Now engines have small passages and galleries through which oil or automatic transmission fluid flow and there are one-way valves that keep the fluids from backtracking for whatever reason. By using an aggressive cleaning procedure like flushing, large chunks of accumulated sludge are broken off and forced backwards through these galleries and valves and, more often than not, lodge tightly and block them. This cuts off the normal flow of the fluid and causes lack of lubrication in an engine and abnormal or no shifting in a transmission. The results are expensive repairs, or more often, engine or transmission replacement.
Who Recommends Flushing As Maintenance?

The shops that want to sell you the engine or transmission flush charge anywhere from $49.95 to $99.95, not including a new engine or transmission. Those are extra. And they state quite emphatically that it is recommended that it be done. But who actually recommends that it be done? I checked with GM, Ford, Chrysler, Nissan, Honda and several other new car manufacturers and not one recommended an engine or transmission flush as routine maintenance. In fact, they specifically don't recommend it at all!! The new car dealerships that do sell them use the implication that since they are the dealer that it must be the factory that recommends it. And if they do say the factory recommends it, they are flat out lying to you.
The only ones who do recommend flushing as a maintenance procedure are the companies that sell the flush machines and the shops that buy them. The flush machine manufacturers state quite clearly in their operating manuals not to use their machines on "high-mileage vehicles". That simple statement proves that flushing is not a safe procedure. It also absolves them of any responsibility of any damage that may occur due to the use of their equipment. This leaves the shop wholly responsible for anything that happens and the cost of correcting the damage that occurs.
I know this since I recently appeared as a witness in a lawsuit where a person was sold an engine flush that destroyed his engine.
The Facts...

The fact is, if you do frequent engine oil and filter changes and service the transmission every 15,000 miles there is no need for a flush. I have customers that change their oil every 3,000 miles and they don't need to use fancy oils and filters, and after over 100,000 miles, the oil comes out almost as clean as it goes in. They have regular transmission services and their transmission still shifts like new, even with well over 100,000 miles on it.
If you have neglected regular oil changes and you want to do some interior engine cleaning, get the oil and filter changed and replace one quart of motor oil for one quart of transmission fluid. The transmission fluid has a high detergent content that will clean the engine without damaging it. Do this every 3,000 miles and you will clean the inside of the engine slowly and gently.
If you do get a flush, I recommend you do it when you can afford to replace the engine or transmission.
 

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I did not actually realize that the flush machines use a backflow type of flush. I assumed that they simply pumped out old transmission fluid while filling with new fluid.
 

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We have a flush machine where i work at goodyear and it does not back feed through the system . Uses the transmission pressure to empty the fluid . As the old fluid comes out it pumps in the new fluid . its a wynns flush machine.
 

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We have a flush machine where i work at goodyear and it does not back feed through the system . Uses the transmission pressure to empty the fluid . As the old fluid comes out it pumps in the new fluid . its a wynns flush machine.
I would think that this would be a safe machine to use, as it does nothing more than replace all of the fluid with new fluid. Essentially, all it does is it keeps the fluid topped off during the process. So, to anyone considering a transmission flush, I would say to ask the shop about the flush procedure. If they use a machine that circulates a chemical through whatever it is you are trying to flush, I'd stay away from it. A flush is not necessarily a bad thing, it just depends on how its done. I think we would all agree that its best to replace all of the transmission fluid than about half of it, and we would likewise be angry if we saw the lube guy closing the engine oil drain plug mid stream.
 

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Yeah, I used the trannys fluid pressure to flush mine, granted it's probably not as thorough as flushing it with a backpressure machine, it's probably safer. That way I know I got most of it out, but without dislodging anything and plugging up the ports.
How do you do that? Do you just disconnect one of the transmission cooler
lines and start the truck up and let it run till the the transmission is empty?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Since I don't have time to do mine and my odo reads 45k for my 02. Can I take it to the local Toyota dealer and ask them to just drain and refill? Do you think they will charge me the same for that as it would cost for the standard flushing?
 
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