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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey I’m new here and new to trucks in general. I just purchased this 1999 Tacoma and I love it however the truck was lowered on cheap suspension. I’m currently trying to replace it with some nice suspension but at the same time I’m not trying to break the bank. I’ve seen a lot of beltech kits that seem nice but not sure if they’ll fit as they all say they are for v6 Tacoma’s.Also all the kits I’ve seen are not an even drop why does the front always get lowered less than the rear? I would like yo buy a lowering kit where it will be lowered the same in the front as in the rear. I’m not 100 percent sure of the specs of the current suspension but my friend has a hard body and he dropped his 3inches all around and my truck and my truck sits slightly lower than his does so I’m guessing it may be a 3 or 4 inshore drop on it currently. Could you guys drop some links to some lowering kits or help me piece one together or point me in the right direction? It would be greatly appreciated thank you
 

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· Mambeau / Admin
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First - let's see if we can estimate how far your Taco is dropped as it sits now.

The stock height of a 1999 2WD (5-lug) Regular Cab Taco was 62.0 inches. This measurement was taken at the rear edge of the cab roof.

Measure the height of your Taco at the rear edge of the cab roof, then subtract that measurement from 62.0. This would be the approximate overall amount the truck is dropped (compared to stock / OEM).

Next, it will be important to figure out how much of this overall drop is caused by the suspension (rather than wheel / tire changes).

The 62.0" OEM measurement was based on the standard OEM tires: P195/75 R14
These stock tires had a diameter of 25.5 inches.
The radius of these tires would therefore have been 12.75 (12 3/4) inches.

I see from the photo that your Taco has aftermarket wheels and low-profile tires. This means you need to factor in the different wheel / tire combo to figure out how much of the overall drop is due to suspension mods.

Get the tire size specs off your current tires and go to an online tire calculator such as:


Use the calculator to find the dimensions of your current tires.

Assuming your current tires' diameter is less than the OEM tires ...

Subtract the diameter of your current tires from 25.5. Now divide the result (total diameter difference) by 2 to get the difference in tire radius. This radius difference represents the amount of overall drop caused by smaller tires.

Now subtract this radius difference (drop caused by tires alone) from the overall drop figure you got from the first step above. This should be the approximate amount of drop caused by suspension mods alone.
 

· Mambeau / Admin
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... I’m currently trying to replace it with some nice suspension but at the same time I’m not trying to break the bank. I’ve seen a lot of beltech kits that seem nice but not sure if they’ll fit as they all say they are for v6 Tacoma’s. ...
As far as the front suspension ... The only component that was different for 4-cylinder versus 6-cylinder 5-lug Tacos (1998 - 2000) was the coil springs. Except for that, all the components are the same.

This suggests any kit that will fit up on a V6 Taco of that era will fit up on yours. However ...

The amount of drop you get depends on weight. A given kit will drop a 4-cylinder front end less than a 6-cylinder front end because of the difference in engine weight.
 

· Mambeau / Admin
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... Also all the kits I’ve seen are not an even drop why does the front always get lowered less than the rear? I would like yo buy a lowering kit where it will be lowered the same in the front as in the rear. ...
1995.5 - 2004 Taco drops are usually spec'd as yielding one inch more drop in the rear than in the front. The reason is because Tacos in this era weren't exactly level from the factory. The rear end generally sat about 3/4" higher than the front end. The added drop in the rear (designed into the kits) was intended to help level the suspension once it was dropped.

In other words, it's normal for drops to be described as X inches in front and X+1 inches in the rear.
 

· Mambeau / Admin
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Next ... It's going to be critical to determine what was done to your Taco's suspension to get the drop you already have. It makes a difference in figuring out what's been changed, what it will take to undo and re-do the current drop, and what components you may need to get to have everything you need.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Next ... It's going to be critical to determine what was done to your Taco's suspension to get the drop you already have. It makes a difference in figuring out what's been changed, what it will take to undo and re-do the current drop, and what components you may need to get to have everything you need.
Thanks so much man I’ll be taking measurements later today and figuring that stuff out hopefully order a kit Friday, any idea of much much higher then specified the front end would sit due to the 4 cylinder engine instead of the v6?
 

· Mambeau / Admin
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... any idea of much much higher then specified the front end would sit due to the 4 cylinder engine instead of the v6?
Here on CT we've never come up with a reliable figure for the difference. That's not surprising, because it depends on:

  • vehicle cab style
  • what other front suspension mods are in play
  • other mods affecting vehicle weight
  • whether the springs are whole or cut
  • the spring rates for different coils, which in turn depends on ...
  • the particular spring manufacturer and spring part number

Estimated differences mentioned in the past range from roughly 0.5 inches up to roughly 1.0 inches (and multiple values in between).
 
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