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ADMlNAHATER
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Gadget said:
What is the best way to get this off without making more of a mess???
Purell,

mayonnaise,

use an old sock full of ice cubes and rub untill the sap is gone or apply slight pressure to the sap untill it fractures and flakes off..

nail polish remover on a cottom ball

denatured alcohol

OFF bug spray..

These are things I'e tried and all worked great without harming the paints finish..

Use your own descretion and I wont be held responcable if anything happens..

This is "as is" information.. good luck..:waytogo:
 

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Gadget,

Start first with washing your truck. It won't remove the clay, but you need to get the surface clean. The safe, quick, and easy way to remove tree sap would be to use a clay bar.I recommend the Meguiar's Smooth Surface Clay Kit, because it is a complete kit that includes everything you need. Inside the package you will get 2 small clay bars (each one can be cut in half, so you end up with four, and depending on how dirty your truck is, they can be used 2 or 3 times), a bottle of Quick Detailer to lubricate the paint surface, a microfiber towel (a very nice one, I might add) and a sample size of Meguiar's Cleaner Wax, so you can throw some wax on the surface once you're done.

http://www.meguiars.com/?auto-detailing-clay/Smooth-Surface-Clay-Kit

If you can't find the Smooth Surface Kit locally, then any clay kit you can find will do, they just won't include as much stuff as the Meguiar's kit (usually just a bar of clay, or clay and a lubricant). Clay from Mother's, Clay Magic, etc. can be found locally and should do the trick. If the kit does not come with a lubricant, make sure you buy a bottle of quick detailer (again, most any brand should work).

No offense to Chris, but please don't try any of those homemade/improvised solutions. Your paint is not in any immediate danger, so you have time to go to the store and get the right product for the job. I've said it before and I'll say it again, no matter what type of problem you have with your vehicle, there is a product made specifically for it by some car care company. That product will work MUCH better than anything you find under your kitchen sink.
 

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Gadget said:
Man, this stuff is like a glob of epoxy. I will try some of the things recommended. I have the Griots clay handy.

But, I think it is going to take a hammer and chisel...

Gadget
If its really bad try some sort of citrus based degreaser, such as the 3M Adhesive remover described before. I can recommend lots of wonderful products that should work, but you'd won't find them locally. If you can get your hands on 303 Aerospace Claner, that should do the trick and its very safe on paint.
 

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ADMlNAHATER
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kyle said:
No offense to Chris, but please don't try any of those homemade/improvised solutions. Your paint is not in any immediate danger, so you have time to go to the store and get the right product for the job. I've said it before and I'll say it again, no matter what type of problem you have with your vehicle, there is a product made specifically for it by some car care company. That product will work MUCH better than anything you find under your kitchen sink.
I was given a free vehicle that was covered so bad with sap that the truck appeared a margarine yellow.. (supposed to be white)

I've gone the full 9 yards to get it off and I had zero negative results..
a paint job thats more than 20 years old that can still place in a daily driver section of a car show cant be all that bad..

Those products you purchased were orignally improvised and refined to end up as the product you have now.. Ya gadda start somewhere..

I've recieved most of my tips from someone that used to do mobile detailing for dealerships in his area.. He wouldn't steer me wrong because hes my brother..

Just because it sounds like a strange method to fix the situation, doesn't mean its better or worse than some product with a brand name..

Just take it slow and do your research..

DIO!
 

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peanut butter....at least thats what your supposed to do to get it off your hands, so it might work on the truck??!!
 

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How about bugs? I have got bugs stuck all over my front grill, headlights and bumper. I have tried Rain-x Bug and Tar remover, but it was not very effective. Any thoughts?
 

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Chris D. said:
I was given a free vehicle that was covered so bad with sap that the truck appeared a margarine yellow.. (supposed to be white)

I've gone the full 9 yards to get it off and I had zero negative results..
a paint job thats more than 20 years old that can still place in a daily driver section of a car show cant be all that bad..

Those products you purchased were orignally improvised and refined to end up as the product you have now.. Ya gadda start somewhere..

I've recieved most of my tips from someone that used to do mobile detailing for dealerships in his area.. He wouldn't steer me wrong because hes my brother..

Just because it sounds like a strange method to fix the situation, doesn't mean its better or worse than some product with a brand name..

Just take it slow and do your research..

DIO!
Whatever, I'm not going to argue with you about this. I know what I'm talking about. There are products designed specifically to get any job done, why not use them? Also, I'm sorry, but if your brother was a "detailer" for dealerships, then he most likely doesn't know a whole lot. Dealerships get their services from the guy that charges the least. There's a difference between washing/cleaning cars and actually detailing. Most detailers out there would not want dealership jobs.
 

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This is going to sound off the wall but...WD 40. It wont hurt the clear coats on paint and with a little patience it works wonders. Let it soak into the sap and rub the area around the sap as well. Also takes off road tar and hot asphalt tar. I drive a Penn Dot dump truck to the asphalt plant and my baby gets dripped on while pulling underneath the plant. A little time an WD and she looks like new again. Oh, my dump truck has been getting this done to it for the last 7 years and paint looks good yet.
 

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Waxed to Perfection
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How to Remove Tree Sap

To remove the tree sap from your vehicle's surface, you can use finger nail polish remover on a cotton ball. After the sap is removed, make a paste of water and baking soda to wash the affected area, then apply wax.

Another method to remove the sap is to use mineral sprits (it will also remove tar). Use a soft, terry towel, or wash cloth dampened with mineral sprits. After removal, wash the car and apply wax to the affected area.

Tree sap can also be removed by using a water-soluble paint brush cleaner. A common household solution is bacon grease or lard. Just rub it on, and off comes the sap. To get tree sap off of your hands, simply rub mayonnaise on them and wash it off. To remove tree sap and other substances, you can use common solvents like lighter fluid, rubbing alcohol, WD-40 or even Skin-So-Soft bath oil.

The way to use those materials is to let them do their work of dissolving (in the case of alcohol) or softening (in the case of oils), enough to rub off the remaining sap. If you use the oil, wash the car afterwards to remove it.

You can also use commercial wax and grease-removing products available at auto supply stores. Be sure to wash and dry the car before applying the wax and grease remover. Then dampen a clean cloth with the solvent and rub the affected area. It may require several attempts if the sap is very thick or extremely hard. The surface may appear hazy after the solvent evaporates, but a good wax application will eliminate the haze and complete the job.

Removing tree sap from a car's finish is a bit more difficult than tar, as hardened sap can scratch your paint. I've found that by hand-rubbing the sap spots with mineral spirits or denatured alcohol, I'm able to easily remove the sap without damaging the finish. Mineral spirits and denatured alcohol acts as a solvent to break up and dissolve the sap.

If there is a large amount of sap on the car, or if the sap has been left on the finish for an extended period of time, it can be a lot of work to remove. For these cases, you can try hitting the affected areas with a light-duty buffing compound to remove the hardened surface on the sap spots. Then you can use mineral spirits or a similar solvent to remove it. The light duty buffing compound softens the sap so the solvent can do its job. The goal is to use the least pressure possible to reduce the risk of scratching the paint. After removing heavy sap, always buff the treated areas with a good polish to clean up any marks created during hand-rubbing with solvent. The treated area must also be re-waxed.

Another technique is to use orange based solvents and children's molding clay. Apply a bit of the solvent and rub with the clay. It is abrasive enough to scrub off the sap which has been broken down by the solvent.

The chemicals used to remove road stains can also remove your wax or sealants. After removing tar, sap or bugs, plan to spot wax or re-wax your vehicle. If you don't have time to wax right away, use a quick detailing spray that contains wax. A quick spray wax is great for this kind of spot waxing, too.

Old tar, tree sap, and paint over-spray can be easily removed with a miraculous new product called automotive clay. As you rub it across any type of surface (paint, glass, plastic, metal, rubber, vinyl) it instantly sticks-to and pulls-off all contamination that is stuck to the surface. Here's how to use an automotive clay bar:

*

To use the automotive clay, spray a water-based lubricant on a small area of your car and rub the bar back and forth with light to medium pressure. If the lubricant begins to dry, you'll need to spray more. Clay bars are fairly sticky, and they cannot be used dry.
*

After a few passes with the clay bar, rub your hand over the area to feel if the surface contamination was removed. Keep rubbing until all contamination bumps are gone. Finally, wipe the clay residue off with a soft terry cloth towel, and buff to a nice luster. Just like waxing, work in small areas.
*

Check the clay bar frequently for hard particles. When found, pick them off. Make it a habit to occasionally knead and reform the bar so that a fresh portion of the bar contacts your car's paint.
*

When you're finished claying your car, you should go over it with a pre-wax cleaner to finish cleaning the paint and restore essential oils. Then, protect your newly cleaned finish with one or more coats of rich Carnauba wax.
 

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QA1 Founding Father
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4,471 Posts
glassdoc said:
How to Remove Tree Sap

To remove the tree sap from your vehicle's surface, you can use finger nail polish remover on a cotton ball. After the sap is removed, make a paste of water and baking soda to wash the affected area, then apply wax.

Another method to remove the sap is to use mineral sprits (it will also remove tar). Use a soft, terry towel, or wash cloth dampened with mineral sprits. After removal, wash the car and apply wax to the affected area.

Tree sap can also be removed by using a water-soluble paint brush cleaner. A common household solution is bacon grease or lard. Just rub it on, and off comes the sap. To get tree sap off of your hands, simply rub mayonnaise on them and wash it off. To remove tree sap and other substances, you can use common solvents like lighter fluid, rubbing alcohol, WD-40 or even Skin-So-Soft bath oil.

The way to use those materials is to let them do their work of dissolving (in the case of alcohol) or softening (in the case of oils), enough to rub off the remaining sap. If you use the oil, wash the car afterwards to remove it.

You can also use commercial wax and grease-removing products available at auto supply stores. Be sure to wash and dry the car before applying the wax and grease remover. Then dampen a clean cloth with the solvent and rub the affected area. It may require several attempts if the sap is very thick or extremely hard. The surface may appear hazy after the solvent evaporates, but a good wax application will eliminate the haze and complete the job.

Removing tree sap from a car's finish is a bit more difficult than tar, as hardened sap can scratch your paint. I've found that by hand-rubbing the sap spots with mineral spirits or denatured alcohol, I'm able to easily remove the sap without damaging the finish. Mineral spirits and denatured alcohol acts as a solvent to break up and dissolve the sap.

If there is a large amount of sap on the car, or if the sap has been left on the finish for an extended period of time, it can be a lot of work to remove. For these cases, you can try hitting the affected areas with a light-duty buffing compound to remove the hardened surface on the sap spots. Then you can use mineral spirits or a similar solvent to remove it. The light duty buffing compound softens the sap so the solvent can do its job. The goal is to use the least pressure possible to reduce the risk of scratching the paint. After removing heavy sap, always buff the treated areas with a good polish to clean up any marks created during hand-rubbing with solvent. The treated area must also be re-waxed.

Another technique is to use orange based solvents and children's molding clay. Apply a bit of the solvent and rub with the clay. It is abrasive enough to scrub off the sap which has been broken down by the solvent.

The chemicals used to remove road stains can also remove your wax or sealants. After removing tar, sap or bugs, plan to spot wax or re-wax your vehicle. If you don't have time to wax right away, use a quick detailing spray that contains wax. A quick spray wax is great for this kind of spot waxing, too.

Old tar, tree sap, and paint over-spray can be easily removed with a miraculous new product called automotive clay. As you rub it across any type of surface (paint, glass, plastic, metal, rubber, vinyl) it instantly sticks-to and pulls-off all contamination that is stuck to the surface. Here's how to use an automotive clay bar:

*

To use the automotive clay, spray a water-based lubricant on a small area of your car and rub the bar back and forth with light to medium pressure. If the lubricant begins to dry, you'll need to spray more. Clay bars are fairly sticky, and they cannot be used dry.
*

After a few passes with the clay bar, rub your hand over the area to feel if the surface contamination was removed. Keep rubbing until all contamination bumps are gone. Finally, wipe the clay residue off with a soft terry cloth towel, and buff to a nice luster. Just like waxing, work in small areas.
*

Check the clay bar frequently for hard particles. When found, pick them off. Make it a habit to occasionally knead and reform the bar so that a fresh portion of the bar contacts your car's paint.
*

When you're finished claying your car, you should go over it with a pre-wax cleaner to finish cleaning the paint and restore essential oils. Then, protect your newly cleaned finish with one or more coats of rich Carnauba wax.
this should go in the tech section:headbang:

nice write up
 
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